After a negative session, stocks have risen.

After a negative session, stocks have risen in the Asia-Pacific.

U.S. indexes inched higher overnight and the producer price index showed a decrease in wholesale prices of 0.1% in August amid inflation fears.

U.S. stock indexes were modestly higher in early trading Thursday, a day after a broad sell-off led by declines in technology stocks. The Dow Jones industrial average rose 43 points, or 0.2%, to 18,526 as of 9:35 a.m. Eastern time. The Standard & Poor's 500 index gained 4 points, or 0.2%, to 2,181. The Nasdaq composite was up 11 points, or 0.2%, to 5,232..

The Labor Department said Thursday that its producer price index, which measures inflation pressures before they reach consumers, fell 0.1% last month following two straight monthly increases of 0.3%. Excluding volatile food and energy costs, so-called "core" producer prices also dipped 0.1%.

Inflation has been running below the Federal Reserve's target level of 2% for more than four years even as the economy has added jobs at a solid pace and unemployment has fallen to a low 4.9%.

Subsection 2 The Nikkei 225 in Japan rose 0.16% and the Topix index was 0.15% higher.

Tokyo stocks opened higher on Thursday as the yen weakened against the dollar following a "rate check" by the Bank of Japan (BOJ).

The Nikkei 225 index rose 0.16 percent or 32.33 points to 20,269.31 in early trade while the broader Topix index was up 0.15 percent or 2.27 points at 1,621.94.

The BOJ left its key interest rate unchanged at -0.1 percent and maintained its 80 trillion yen ($571 billion) annual asset-purchasing program aimed at spurring inflation to its 2 percent target, as widely expected.

However, the central bank said it would conduct a review of its massive stimulus program at its next meeting in September, which analysts saw as a sign that further action could be taken then if needed.

The dollar fetched 103.53 yen in early Asian trade, compared with 103.40 yen in New York late Wednesday afternoon and up from around 102 yen seen earlier this week -- levels not seen since February 2016 when Tokyo intervened to weaken the Japanese unit.

The Japanese yen was last trading at 143 against the dollar after a reported "rate check" by the Bank of Japan.

The Japanese yen was last trading at 143 against the dollar after a reported "rate check" by the Bank of Japan (BOJ). The BOJ left its key interest rate unchanged at -0.1 percent and maintained its 80 trillion yen ($571 billion) annual asset-purchasing program aimed at spurring inflation to its 2 percent target, as widely expected.. However, the central bank said it would conduct a review of its massive stimulus program at its next meeting in September, which analysts saw as a sign that further action could be taken then if needed."

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