Ford lays out plan for electric vehicle investments to make profits like Tesla.

Ford Motor asks dealers to invest in upgrades to sell all-electric vehicles.

Two investment options are available to dealers.

Ford is offering two different investment options to its dealers in order to become "EV-certified." The first option is an investment of $500,000, and the second option is an investment of $1.2 million.

Dealers have until Oct. 31 to make a decision.

Dealers have until October 31st to decide whether or not they want to invest in becoming EV-certified. If they choose not to invest, they will still be able to sell Ford's EVs, but they will not be allocated as many EVs as those who do choose to invest.

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The automaker is betting on its dealers to sell EVs.

Tesla and other startups sell EVs directly to consumers.

Tesla, the world's most valuable automaker, has been selling EVs directly to consumers since it was founded in 2003. Other startups such as Rivian and Lucid Motors have followed suit. These companies have bypassed the traditional dealership model, which Ford is relying on to sell its EVs.

Ford plans to sell EVs through its traditional and commercial businesses.

Ford plans to sell its EVs through both its traditional dealership network and its commercial business arm. The automaker is betting that its dealers will be able to sell EVs profitably, despite the higher upfront costs associated with electric vehicles.

Ford's plans to sell EVs have been a point of contention since the company split off its all-electric vehicle business earlier this year into a separate division known as Model e. Farley said the automaker and its dealers needed to lower costs, increase profits and deliver better, more consistent customer sales experiences.

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Ford's plans to sell EVs have been a point of contention.

The automaker split off its all-electric vehicle business earlier this year.

In February, Ford announced it was spinning off its electric vehicle business into a separate division known as Model e. The move was seen as a way to cut costs and increase profits. However, it also caused some tension between the automaker and its dealers.

CEO Jim Farley said the automaker and its dealers needed to lower costs and increase profits.

At a dealer meeting in Las Vegas last week, Farley said the main message he has for dealers is that they need to lower costs, increase profits and deliver better, more consistent customer sales experiences. He also said that Ford is betting on its dealers to sell EVs.

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