Jim Cramer says Wall Street should stop making calls telling people to get out.

Jim Cramer says Wall Street should stop making calls telling people to get out.

CNBC's Jim Cramer on Wednesday said that investors urging traders to exit the market while they still can are about a year too late.

Cramer made the comments on CNBC's "Squawk on the Street" a day after the Dow Jones Industrial Average plunged more than 800 points, or 3%, in its worst day since February 8, 2018. The S&P 500 and Nasdaq Composite also tumbled, with the latter falling into correction territory.

Many market participants attributed Tuesday's sell-off to a number of factors, including trade tensions between the U.S. and China, weak economic data from Germany and concerns about corporate profits.

"The real story is we're in a bear market. This has been a bear market for months now," Cramer said. "And anyone who is telling you to get out now is really doing you a disservice because they should have told you to get out months ago."

Cramer noted that there are many industries that have seen significant losses this year, including technology stocks. The tech-heavy Nasdaq is down more than 9% from its all-time high set in early September.

"We're already nearly a year into this decline. I just wish the so-called professionals would act like it," Cramer said.

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Stocks rose slightly higher on Wednesday as they fought to recover after the major indexes saw the biggest single-day drop in over two years on Tuesday.

The Dow Jones Industrial Average rose about 100 points, or 0.4%, while the S&P 500 and Nasdaq Composite each gained about 0.3%.

The market's rebound came as investors eyed the Federal Reserve's meeting next week, where it's expected to raise interest rates by 75 or 100 basis points.

"The market is trying to come back from a very bad day yesterday," said Peter Cardillo, chief market economist at Spartan Capital Securities. "A lot of it has to do with the Fed."

Tuesday's sell-off was driven by a number of economic indicators that showed the economy was slowing down. These included weaker-than-expected manufacturing data and a drop in consumer confidence.

Subsection 2.5 "Investors are still digesting some of the weak economic data we've seen lately," said Cardillo.

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According to Cramer, while there are industries that have seen huge declines this year, such as tech, there are also lower-profile bear markets that show the market declines have been far-reaching.

Auto companies have seen losses this year, as have retail stocks, he pointed out.

Cramer said that while the market has been in decline for a while now, there are still opportunities available for investors. He urged traders to stay invested in the market, even if the stock prices are down.

"We're already nearly a year into this decline. I just wish the so-called professionals would act like it," Cramer said.

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"We're already nearly a year into this decline. I just wish the so-called professionals would act like it," Cramer said.

"We're already nearly a year into this decline. I just wish the so-called professionals would act like it," Cramer said. He noted that while there are industries that have seen huge declines this year, such as tech, there are also lower-profile bear markets that show the market declines have been far-reaching. Auto companies have seen losses this year, as have retail stocks, he pointed out.

Cramer said that investors should stay invested in the market, even if the stock prices are down, because there are a number of opportunities available. "There are still plenty of good companies out there doing well despite the overall market conditions," he said.

The bottom line, according to Cramer, is that traders should stop making calls telling people to get out of the market. "It's too late for that," he said. "If you're going to sell, you should have sold a long time ago."

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