Nornickel plans to increase their employees' stake in the mining company, according to the company's largest shareholder.

Nornickel plans to increase employees' stake in the company.

This is part of a larger 10-year programme called "Digital Investor".

Nornickel plans to increase the equity holdings of employees and other individuals to collectively comprise 25% of the company, up from 10% now, its largest shareholder Vladimir Potanin told RBC TV. The change would be included in a 10-year programme called "Digital Investor" that would begin in 2023, and would involve digital financial assets and lock-up periods. He did not give further details about the plan or how the equity holdings would be increased.

The increase in equity holdings would be done through digital financial assets and lock-up periods.

Potanin said the change would be included in a 10-year programme called "Digital Investor" that would begin in 2023, and would involve digital financial assets and lock-up periods. He did not give further details about the plan or how the equity holdings would be increased.

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The idea for a Nornickel-Rusal merger has been postponed.

Potanin floated the idea of a $60 billion merger of the two companies in July.

The idea has been postponed until Rusal is ready for talks.

In July, Vladimir Potanin, Nornickel's largest shareholder, floated the idea of a $60 billion merger between Nornickel and Rusal as a means of mitigating possible sanctions risks. However, on Saturday Potanin said that the idea had been postponed and that there are no current plans to renew talks.

The postponement of the merger proposal comes as both companies are preparing to reorient themselves more towards Asian markets. This is in response to changing sanctions policy and "self-sanctioning" clients, which have led to decreased demand for Russian metals in Europe and the United States. Despite this shift, Europe and the United States still account for the majority of Nornickel's sales.

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Nornickel is preparing to reorient itself more towards Asian markets.

This is in response to changing sanctions policy and "self-sanctioning" clients.

Nornickel, the world's top palladium and refined nickel producer, is preparing to reorient itself more towards Asian markets, in response to changing sanctions policy and "self-sanctioning" clients.

The company has been hit hard by Western sanctions imposed on Russia over its involvement in the conflict in Ukraine, as well as by self-imposed sanctions by some of its clients in Europe and the United States.

As a result, Nornickel has been forced to look for new markets for its products, and Asia is seen as a key growth area.

"We are actively working to diversify our sales geography and reduce our dependence on traditional markets," said Norilsk Nickel CEO Vladimir Potanin in a recent interview with Bloomberg.

"In the past few years we have significantly increased our sales to Asia, and today it accounts for around 30% of our total sales."

Potanin said that Nornickel was looking to increase its Asian market share even further, and that the company was investing heavily in marketing and promotion in the region.

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