Walmart launches virtual fitting room to encourage shoppers to buy more clothes.

Walmart launches virtual fitting room to encourage shoppers to buy more clothes.

The retailer is rolling out its latest version of virtual try-on, which allows shoppers to upload an image of themselves and see how items would look.

Walmart is rolling out its latest version of virtual try-on, which allows shoppers to upload an image of themselves and see how items would look on their own bodies. The new tool is part of the company's acquisition of Zeekit, a virtual fitting room startup.

Shoppers can use the tool to virtually try on more than 270,000 items across Walmart's private brands, select items from national brands, such as Champion, Levi's and Hanes, and some sold on its third-party marketplace.

Customers can choose either option, using their own image or a model who is similar. With the personalized tool, the website uses a scan of a person's body to provide a more realistic sense of how a fabric drapes, a color looks or where a sleeve or hem hits — without stepping inside of a store.

As some shoppers reduce their spending on clothes, Walmart is rolling out a new tool that it hopes will nudge them toward clicking the "buy" button.

Walmart is unveiling the new tool at a time when selling new outfits has gotten tougher. As inflation drives up prices of food, rent and more, consumers have begun to make decisions on where to cut back. The big-box retailer joined a growing list of companies, including Target and Best Buy, which slashed their full-year profit outlook as people buy less discretionary merchandise. Walmart now expects adjusted earnings per share to decline between 9% and 11% for the full year.

For the discounter, however, budget-consciousness could come with a potential silver lining. The company raised its sales forecast in July because it was getting a lift from shoppers seeking low-priced groceries and essentials even as they buy fewer high-margin items. It is also drawing more customers with annual household incomes of $100,000 or more, the company said on its earnings call in August.

Denise Incandela, the executive vice president of apparel and private brands at Walmart U.S., said she wants to encourage more of those customers to fill their closets at Walmart, too.

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Using the tool, customers can choose either to use their own image or a model who is similar.

With the personalized tool, the website uses a scan of a person's body to provide a more realistic sense of how a fabric drapes, a color looks or where a sleeve or hem hits.

When customers use the virtual fitting room tool, they can choose to upload their own image, or select from a range of models who have similar body types. The website then uses a scan of the customer's body to generate a realistic view of how the clothes would look on them. This includes details such as how the fabric drapes, what colors look like, and where sleeves and hems hit.

This is useful for customers who want to get an idea of how an item will look on them before committing to purchase it. It also takes away some of the guesswork involved in online shopping, which can often be frustrating for customers who are unsure about sizing or fit. By providing this service, Walmart hopes to encourage more shoppers to buy clothes from its website.

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The Impact of Walmart's Virtual Fitting Room

While it remains to be seen how successful Walmart's virtual fitting room will be in driving sales, the tool does have the potential to change the way people shop for clothes. For one, it could make trying on clothes more convenient, since shoppers wouldn't have to go to a store to do so. Additionally, it could allow people to try on a wider range of clothing styles and sizes than they might ordinarily be able to in a brick-and-mortar store. And finally, it could help reduce returns, as shoppers would have a better idea of how an item looks and fits before they purchase it.

There are also some potential drawbacks to the virtual fitting room. For instance, it might discourage people from actually going into stores and trying on clothes in person. Additionally, some shoppers may find the experience of trying on clothes virtually to be less satisfying than doing so in person. And finally, there is always the possibility that items might not look exactly as they do in the virtual fitting room once they're received by the shopper.

Overall, Walmart's virtual fitting room is a potentially game-changing innovation that could revolutionize the way people shop for clothes. Time will tell whether shoppers embrace it or not.

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